#worklifebalance 

Check out the roster of sweets I’ve had at my desk this summer. SUGAR KEEPS ME SANE AND PRODUCTIVE I SWEAR WHERES THE SUGAR I NEED MORE SUGAR.

In all seriousness, what keeps you going on a workday? For me, it’s my co-workers and the lovely view of Seattle I have from my desk. The thought of a home cooked dinner with David then a Netflix unwind session helps me power through as well.

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Kauai Family Restaurant.

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Hawaiian food at Kauai Family Restaurant with David’s sister and baby niece who were visiting from the U.K.

(Mary is new to Hawaiian food, but familiar with our raving about it, so a visit to KFR was absolutely critical.)

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Tuna poke.

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Crispy ginger chicken.

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Kalua pork plate.

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Breakfast plate with spam.

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The best sheet cake in Seattle at Cakes of Paradise.

These cakes are incredibly moist and covered in light, whipped frosting that’s not too sweet. Imagine the soft texture of angel cake with the density of pudding cake in unique tropical flavors like coconut, guava and passion fruit. Now stop imagining it because you’ll grow frustrated that you’re not there buying a slice right now.

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Haupia (coconut pudding) cake.

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Guava cake – my favorite.

Food

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Sushi Maru.

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Seared salmon.

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Spider roll.

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Apple pie caramel apple from Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory.

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Homemade choa mian.

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Pancakes at Daily Grill.

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Cantonese food at Pacific Cafe.

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Hong Kong is famous for these “bakes.” This variation has fried pork over fried rice drenched in sweet tomato sauce.

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Vegetable chao fun.

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Cantonese pastries: Pineapple bun and coconut cream bun.

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Homemade clam chowder using lobster stock from our Valentine’s Day rolls :)

What we ate: Taiwanese sweets.

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 Taiwanese shaved ice with red bean.

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 With sweet peanuts.

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 Dou Hua, a Taiwanese dessert of silken tofu that is lightly sweetened. You eat it the same way you would eat shaved ice: with various toppings, but it can be prepared either hot or cold.

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 Tiny passion fruit popsicle from Ice Monster, a famous shaved ice shop in Taipei. We didn’t have their shaved ice, but got a taste by visiting their pricey popsicle stand outside of the shop.

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 CHOCOLATE BREAD.

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Hot Pineapple bun with butter, a classic treat in Hong Kong. Though we were there earlier in the trip, we ended up tasting this in Taiwan. David loved it, but the melted butter was a bit too intense for me.

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The best Dou Hua I’ve ever had is from Zhuang Tou Dou Hua (庄頭豆花), a humble shop near our airbnb with incredibly fresh toppings and the silkiest Dou Hua. This is a must try!

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 The best.

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 Mango snow ice. Snow ice is a creamier and more modern counterpart to traditional shaved ice. The flavor is in the ice like a slushee, and it’s often topped with fruits like mango or strawberry and sweets like sprinkles and whipped cream.

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 My beloved Mister Donut.

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 Jiunn Meei is a famous pastry company from Taichung that specializes in pineapple and moon cakes.

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 This moon cake is firm and flaky on the outside with a chewy middle that holds a delicious filling of red bean and pine nuts. Layers of complex tastes and textures!

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These street treats are popular in Taiwan, and I’m not exactly sure what to call them. Let’s call them: egg-y dough-y biscuits with ADDICTIVE CUSTARD on the inside that I can slam down in 30 seconds.

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 Warm custard, or “nai you” (milk oil).

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And one with red bean paste.