Burger.

As mentioned before, I went through a late-winter-burger-eating kick that makes my Spring “body bounce back” even more difficult than I would like. In reality, burgers are not terrible for you and are often comprised of a healthy balance of vegetables, protein and carbohydrates. Unfortunately, there are few places in Seattle that guarantee a completely fresh and custom burger to your liking, so we decided to make our own burgers for a change.

Mine is the one with the egg. Per usual.

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Marjorie.

I treasure the dinners I have with Sinae. Our busy work schedules in different cities makes it difficult to meet for the weekly dinners we grew accustom to at our old jobs. So, our weekend catch ups have become one of the highlights of my months. I leave these dinners with my belly stuffed and heart more full of love for this girl. Our latest dinner was at Marjorie, a tiny and homey restaurant on the border of Capitol Hill and First Hill. Their menu is artfully constructed with multiple tastes and sophistications in mind (not often do you find a place that offers escaviche along side a pizza and a burger).

Please excuse the fuzzy pictures, the lighting was extra romantic.

Seared Brussels Sprouts, Cider, Bacon

Butter Lettuce Salad Sunflower Seeds Brittle, Frangelico Vinaigrette (I loved this!)

Kayla’s Kitchari Indian Potage of Roasted Sweet Potatoes, Red Lentils, Brown
Jasmine Rice, Coconut Milk, Spicy Coriander-Coconut Chutney (I’m a congee lover, carboloader and noodle lover, so this hearty dish of healthier more dynamic carbohydrates hit the spot for me.)

Ping’s Dumpling House.

David and I both studied abroad in China during college (Beijing for him and Shanghai for me our Junior year; it’s quite serendipitous because we didn’t know each other at the time). As such, we take pride in knowing what authentic Chinese cooking tastes like and can identify  the traditional spices and herbs only incorporated in local dishes. Ping’s Dumpling House in the International District surprised us with how “true-to-mainland” the dishes tasted. Whole peppercorns, thick dough, potent vinegar and garlic that sticks to the back of your throat; we were immediately reminded of our times abroad when this style of food was the norm.

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Mapo Tofu.

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Green onion pancake.

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Pork and cabbage dumplings.

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Xiao long bao – soup dumplings.